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Honda PH launches the P1,495,000 HR-V RS Navi

Together with the regular, face-lifted variant

The HR-V has an RS variant that is sure to turn heads. PHOTO FROM HONDA

Starting today, August 24th, the face-lifted version of the second-generation Honda HR-V subcompact crossover SUV is already available at the Japanese automaker’s 38 dealerships in the Philippines. Boasting a new-design grille-and-bumper combo up front, the new HR-V now features LED headlamps (with daytime running lights) and taillights. That’s on top of various other enhancements inside and out, including new 17-inch black alloy wheels and a new seven-inch touchscreen display with integrated Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

But the big story here is the introduction of a new RS variant, which you see in these photos. Incidentally, the Phoenix Orange Pearl paint job here is exclusive to the new RS Navi edition. Other colors are Passion Red Pearl (a fresh shade), Taffeta White, Modern Steel Metallic and Lunar Silver Metallic (exclusive to the regular E variant).

Bright LED fog lights are standard on the RS variant. PHOTOS FROM HONDA

Externally, you can distinguish the HR-V RS by its honeycomb grille, LED fog lights, dark-chrome door handles, two-tone 17-inch alloy wheels, and smoked LED taillights. Entering the cabin, HR-V RS passengers will easily notice its full-leather seats, piano-black accents, and seven-inch touchscreen monitor with GPS navigation.

The new HR-V retains its 1.8-liter SOHC i-VTEC gasoline engine rated at 140hp and 172Nm, and mated to an Earth Dreams continuously variable transmission. Like other modern Honda models, this crossover comes with the so-called Econ mode for better fuel efficiency.

Smoked LED taillights make the rear nicer to look at. PHOTO FROM HONDA

The cosmetically revised HR-V is priced as follows:

  • RS Navi CVT – P1,495,000
  • E CVT – P1,295,000

You should already find units sitting prettily in Honda showrooms from today. Have fun shopping.



Vernon B. Sarne

Vernon is the founder and editor-in-chief of VISOR. He has been an automotive journalist for 23 years. He became one by serendipity, walking into the office of a small publishing company and applying for a position he had no idea was for a local car magazine. The rest, as they say, is rock and roll.



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