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Ranking the 10 most egg-shaped cars ever built

Listed in the order of their ‘eggness’, just because it’s Easter

Happy Easter, guys! Today, as we remember and celebrate the triumphant resurrection of Jesus Christ, we want to provide you with a piece that pays tribute to the egg, the most universal symbol of this Christian occasion we commemorate every year. Here is a list of the 10 most egg-shaped automobiles ever built, ranked according to the resemblance of their exterior to the oval pattern that most likely inspired their designers. We’re sure there are a few missing here, so feel free to call us out in the comments.

Toyota Echo. PHOTO FROM TOYOTA

10. Toyota Echo. Two decades ago, the Japanese automaker released a cute hatchback called the Echo in our market. It was the first-generation model of the runabout we now know as the Yaris. It didn’t really take off in the Philippines, but it did set the stage for the next batch of hot-selling trunkless cars like the Honda Jazz. Eggness: 6.5/10

Honda Brio. PHOTO FROM HONDA

9. Honda Brio. If you found the original Jazz adorable, your heart likely fluttered at the sight of the smaller Brio. Equipped with a peppy engine, this car had the right proportions that made it an ideal urban transporter—something you couldn’t say about the awkwardly sculpted Brio Amaze sedan. Eggness: 6.8/10

Nissan Micra. PHOTO FROM NISSAN

8. Nissan Micra. This model is the one car its manufacturer should consider bringing into our territory. Technically speaking, it was once sold here as the Verita in Taiwan-market guise (thanks to Yulon Motor), but we want the real deal. Pictured above is the third-generation version. Eggness: 7/10

Smart Fortwo. PHOTO FROM DAIMLER

7. Smart Fortwo. Easily the most popular microcar in modern times, the Fortwo was hugely responsible for making tiny and efficient vehicles fashionable. Unfortunately, it’s made by Daimler AG of Germany, which means its pricing will never be affordable on our shores. Eggness: 7.5/10

Mitsubishi i-MiEV. PHOTO FROM MITSUBISHI

6. Mitsubishi i-MiEV. The so-called Mitsubishi Innovative Electric Vehicle placed the otherwise struggling automotive firm at the forefront of EV technology. In 2011, it was proclaimed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as the most efficient car among 2012 models, with a combined city-and-highway consumption of 47.6km/L (since electric cars do not consume fuel, the i-MiEV’s energy consumption was converted to simulate fuel mileage). Eggness: 8/10

BMW Isetta. PHOTO FROM BMW

5. BMW Isetta. Long before the Munich-based car and motorcycle manufacturer even dreamed of producing luxurious SUVs, it had briefly dabbled in diminutive, quirky transportation via the iconic Isetta. Launched in the mid-1950s, this was based on the microcar designed by Italy’s Iso, but had a one-cylinder Motorrad engine. Eggness: 8.5/10

Volkswagen Beetle. PHOTO FROM VOLKSWAGEN

4. Volkswagen Beetle. Is there a more beloved model in automotive history than the original people’s car from Germany? Conceptualized by Ferdinand Porsche and supported by Adolf Hitler, the Beetle helped shape car culture in a way no other vehicle has. Some robot named Bumblebee even has it as its alter ego. Eggness: 8.7/10

Brütsch Mopetta. PHOTO FROM CLASSICCARS.COM

3. Brütsch Mopetta. In compiling models to be included on this list, we came across a defunct German microcar maker called Egon Brütsch Fahrzeugbau, which also happened to be based in Stuttgart back in the 1950s. One of its creations was this three-wheeler roadster that looked like a theme-park ride. Eggness: 9.1/10

Microlino Bubble Car. PHOTO FROM MICRO MOBILITY SYSTEMS

2. Microlino Bubble Car. A Swiss company called Micro Mobility Systems is responsible for this thing, which measures just 2,430mm long and runs on an 11kW electric motor that offers a driving range of 125km from a single full charge of its 8kWh battery. Complementing it in the brand’s limited product line is the Vespa-looking Microletta three-wheeled scooter. Eggness: 9.5/10

Waymo Self-Driving Car. PHOTO FROM WAYMO

1. Waymo Self-Driving Car. The name is formed from the phrase “a new way forward in mobility.” The brand started life as Google’s autonomous vehicle division, and the driverless car you see above used to have the tech firm’s decals. Waymo became a stand-alone enterprise in December 2016, though still owned by Google’s parent company, Alphabet Inc. Its mission remains the same: to make human input completely unnecessary in tomorrow’s automobiles. Eggness: 10/10



Vernon B. Sarne

Vernon is the founder and editor-in-chief of VISOR. He has been an automotive journalist for 25 years. He became one by serendipity, walking into the office of a small publishing company and applying for a position he had no idea was for a local car magazine. The rest, as they say, is rock and roll. He writes the column ‘Spoiler’.



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