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Cars > Transform

This lady has just found her perfect celebrity van

A Toyota Hiace Super Grandia modified by Atoy Customs

What a gorgeous and curvaceous chair. We want. PHOTO FROM ATOY CUSTOMS

The lady in the above photo is Mariam Al-alawi, a contestant during the sixth season of the TV talent competition StarStruck, which airs on the GMA network. She apparently prefers to be called Ivana Alawi these days, but that’s not the main story here. We’re doing this article to show off her Toyota Hiace Super Grandia, which was recently modified by Atoy Customs.

People like watching themselves on the road. PHOTOS FROM ATOY CUSTOMS

Prior to this Super Grandia mod, the popular vehicle customizer had already transformed the likes of the Hyundai H350 and the Nissan Urvan into rolling bedrooms and lounges, as more and more personalities now hire him to create “celebrity vans” for them.

Stuck in traffic? Might as well enjoy the time. PHOTOS FROM ATOY CUSTOMS

According to Atoy Llave, this particular project cost its owner some P600,000. This includes two executive chairs with footrests, a rear chair, a sofa bed, a vanity mirror, a fully adjustable table, a 24-inch Samsung TV and a Samsung soundbar, among other things.

Running late for a shoot? No problem. Just have your face made up along the way. PHOTOS FROM ATOY CUSTOMS

This van should allow Mariam Ivana to pamper herself on the road—even while stuck in stress-inducing traffic. Just a thought: Whenever she’s sitting in traffic, she becomes starstuck. (Yes, we just hit you with a tito joke.)

This pic is hypnotizing us into getting a van. PHOTO FROM ATOY CUSTOMS

With the traffic situation not showing any signs of easing up in the near future, it’s probably wise to splurge on motoring luxuries if you can afford them—especially if you’re in the business of looking beautiful and stress-free. And should you decide to do so, you now have another van option to meet your needs.



Vernon B. Sarne

Vernon is the founder and editor-in-chief of VISOR. He has been an automotive journalist for 23 years. He became one by serendipity, walking into the office of a small publishing company and applying for a position he had no idea was for a local car magazine. The rest, as they say, is rock and roll.



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